Oct. 06, 2017

Concealed Carry Seminar Coming Nov. 2

 

Rep. Garth Everett and I will host another of our popular Concealed Carry Seminars on Thursday, Nov. 2, at 6 p.m., at the Trout Run Fire Company, 241 State Route 14, Trout Run.

Presenters will include Lycoming County District Attorney Eric Linhardt, who will discuss Pennsylvania’s Castle Doctrine and Stand Your Ground laws; Lycoming County Sheriff Mark Lusk who will explain rules and regulations surrounding licenses to carry firearms; a police officer will discuss how to safely interact with the police when carrying a firearm; and an officer from the Pennsylvania Game Commission to discuss firearm carry laws as they relate to hunting seasons.

Seating is limited and advance registration is required. Those interested in attending should contact my district office by calling (570) 321-1270 or emailing Kristi Marshall at kmarshall@pahousegop.com.
 
 
House GOP Continues Fight for Responsible Budgeting


 
Lawmakers were back in Harrisburg this week continuing the effort to bring the 2017-18 state budget process to a close.

The main component still outstanding is a bill to complete funding of the $32 billion spending plan. While the governor has pushed for higher taxes and the state Senate approved a plan to impose nearly $600 million in new taxes – more than $400 million of which would come in the form of new and increased taxes on consumer utility bills – House Republicans are fighting for a more responsible, less burdensome solution.

I talked with the Williamsport Sun Gazette on the budget. You can read the article here.

While negotiations on a revenue plan continue, lawmakers did approve two important measures that will help save taxpayer dollars in the long term. House Bill 785 would enact substantial debt reduction and responsible debt management policies that would save taxpayers an estimated $3.14 billion in debt service over the next 20 years. House Bill 785 heads back to the Senate for consideration.

The House also approved a key welfare reform measure that could ultimately require physically and mentally able adults to meet work requirements in order to receive benefits. Under the bill, the state Department of Human Services would seek approval from the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to implement the requirement. House Bill 59 will go to the governor’s desk for his signature.
 


 

Thanks to the Consolidated Sportsmen of Lycoming County for hosting the Shooting Expo and National Sporting Goods for sponsoring the 2017 Shooting Expo on Sept. 30. It was enjoyable to be at the event with our legislative information table.
 
 
Sponsoring an Anti-Fraud Seminar for Nonprofits Oct. 26


I am pleased to join Lycoming County District Attorney Eric Linhardt in hosting an anti-theft seminar for nonprofit organizations on Thursday, Oct. 26, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Williamsport Trade and Transit Centre, 100 W. Third St., Williamsport.

Misericordia University and several county and state organizations, including the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development, will be a part of this event. Dr. Fred Croop, professor of business at Misericordia, will be the keynote speaker on the theme “Preventing Theft in Your Nonprofit Organization.” Dr. Croop is the author of several works on the subject and has cooperated with law enforcement officials, elected leaders and others to conduct seminars in northeast Pennsylvania.

For more information contact Misericordia University at 570-674-6372.
 
 
Better Protecting Consumers from Data Breaches


Legislation is expected to advance in the state House in the coming weeks to respond to recent breaches of personal and financial data. Two new House bills are designed to further protect consumers who are victims of data breaches that open them to possible identity theft.

The first proposal would require notification of a breach from the entity where the breach occurred to the affected consumer within 30 days and to the state attorney general. The notification would include the date the breach occurred, the type of information subject to the breach, a toll-free number and the address of credit reporting agencies. The entities must also develop policies to safeguard and discard personal consumer information.

The second bill would waive the current credit freeze fee, which charges up to $10 per account. In the instance of a data breach, consumers would be provided with three months of free credit monitoring and up to three free credit reports for one calendar year after the date the breach is reported. None of these would apply to a credit reporting agency that has not experienced a breach.

These two bills were introduced following the Equifax data breach, which was the largest data breach in history – exposing the personal information of at least 143 million Americans, including 5.4 million Pennsylvanians.
 
 
‘Right to Try’ Bill Heads to Governor


 
In giving hope to individuals facing terminal illnesses, legislation is now on the governor’s desk that would allow eligible patients to use investigational drugs, biological products and devices not yet approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Under House Bill 45, if these patients want to try medications that have not completed the rigorous FDA testing and approval process, they should be permitted to make that choice. As part of the bill, a manufacturer would be permitted to make these products available to eligible patients once the products successfully complete the first phase of clinical trials.

Physicians would not be held liable for recommending experimental products to their terminally ill patients, nor would the bill create a private cause of action against the manufacturers that make the drugs. While the bill does not require insurers to cover these products, they may do so at their own discretion.

“Right to Try” laws are in effect in 37 other states.

In giving hope to individuals facing terminal illnesses, legislation is now on the governor’s desk that would allow eligible patients to use investigational drugs, biological products and devices not yet approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Under House Bill 45, if these patients want to try medications that have not completed the rigorous FDA testing and approval process, they should be permitted to make that choice. As part of the bill, a manufacturer would be permitted to make these products available to eligible patients once the products successfully complete the first phase of clinical trials.

Physicians would not be held liable for recommending experimental products to their terminally ill patients, nor would the bill create a private cause of action against the manufacturers that make the drugs. While the bill does not require insurers to cover these products, they may do so at their own discretion.

“Right to Try” laws are in effect in 37 other states.
 


 

To honor those who have fought breast cancer or are fighting it now, the fountain at the Pennsylvania State Capitol’s East Wing was dyed pink on Monday for Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The pink fountain is also a reminder to all women of the importance of mammograms and early detection. Every day, 37 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in Pennsylvania, and more than 2,000 Pennsylvania women die each year from the disease. However, more than 2.8 million breast cancer survivors are alive today in the United States.
 
 
PennDOT Closures for Columbus Day Weekend


All PennDOT driver license and photo centers, including its full-service center in Harrisburg, will be closed Saturday, Oct. 7, through Monday, Oct. 9, in observance of Columbus Day.

Customers may still obtain a variety of driver and vehicle products and services, including all forms, publications and driver-training manuals, online through PennDOT’s Driver and Vehicle Services website, dmv.pa.gov.
Share